Pinguicula nivalis

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TAXONOMY:

Family : Lentibulariaceae

Genus : Pinguicula

Name : Pinguicula nivalis (known in culture as Pinguicula from Zaragoza)

Sub-classification (Casper) : link

Publication : not yet published. Publication under writting by Hans Luhrs.

DESCRIPTION :  

no data

translation :

 - Soon - 

ORIGIN AND HISTORY :

This species was mentioned by Dr Alfred Lau, in Bonn, Germany, in 1998, during  the 2nd conferency of ICPS. He thought of another population of P. immaculata

 

Stan Lampard 's Pinguicula growing list also mentioned this species under the name Pinguicula sp. Zaragoza and confirmed that it was distributed in the past as a subsp. of Pinguicula immaculata.  

 

Many years after, Fernando Rivadavia during its Mexican Pinguicula trips found this species in habitat :

"On Sunday we started out heading S to Zaragoza, which I had visited the weekend before in search of P.cyclosecta. This time I was following a new lead Id received from Eric Partrat during the week, a possible new species close to P.immaculata, which will supposedly be published by Hans Luhrs as P.nivalis in the near future. It was said to have been found in a gorge near Zaragoza. A week before I wouldnt have known where to begin searching for it, but now that I knew what P.immaculata looked like and where it grew, I thought we had a much better chance of uncovering this new plant. But I have to admit I was a bit lost, since I had explored 2 gypsum hills in the vicinities and had seen nothing. Although I might have missed those tiny plants... 

                So 1st thing I did was drive back to one of the gypsum sites I had hiked around. The 3 of us combed the hillsides for about an hour and found no Pings. It seemed too dry, even the N-facing sides. Looking down the valley towards Zaragoza, I realized the surrounding mountains were heavily forested on that side. Could it be more humid over there? So down the road we went towards more gypsum hills I remembered seeing just outside Zaragoza. One of these looked particularly different as it had a sparse cover of pine trees. Hmmmm.... suspicious. But how to get there? It was a bit of a distance from the road. We actually 1st tried driving along a dry riverbed, until we could go no further. On our way back over the loose rubble, we found a dirt road which surprisingly led straight to our goal! 

                Almost immediately after beginning to explore the base of the gypsum hillside, we spotted P.immaculata-like plants: reddish flower scapes sticking out from a darker spot in the white soil. There were loads of plants covering the N side of the hill at about 1425m altitude, and we were able to find a total of 4 open flowers. The 1st impression was that it was P.immaculata. But slowly we began noticing differences, starting with the dormant rosettes which seemed larger. The flowers were possibly a bit larger too and VERY different in shape, starting with the spur which was shorter and fatter. They were white like P.immaculata, but had longer and more numerous white hairs around the yellow patch at the base of the lower lip and the two upper lobes were much larger and wider as well. As for the 3 lobes of the lower lip, these were wedge to heart-shaped (no large apron-like central lobe like P.immaculata) and the two lateral lobes were proportionately more similar in size to the central one. It was actually a lot more similar to P.gracilis.  "

Localisation / Map: 

 

Near Zaragoza, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

 

 

(click on the map for better location and relief map)

   

HABITAT:  

On a pure gypsum hillside, on North side of the hill at about 1425m altitude.

TEMPERATURE and PRECIPITATIONS :

 

No data 

Introduction in culture :

This species can be found since 2004 in a very little number of amateurs collections worldwide but was grown by Stan Lampard many years before. 

CULTURE AND MULTIPLICATION : 

(North hemisphere, France near Paris, in a polycarbonate greenhouse - see the map -)    

Life cycle : The life cycle observed in culture for this Pinguicula consists of two seasons, one wet and the other dry (see link). The plant forms different leaf rosettes according to the season. During the resting months (winter) the small succulent rosette is composed of numerous non-carnivorous leaves. The carnivorous leaves are produced in spring and during all summer. The flowering occurs from winter rosette. The life cycle of the plant is probably similar in it's native habitat but I have no data.

 

Media : On pure gypsum but the usual Mexican mix works also :

I use a 100 % mineral media : 2 perlite, 2 vermiculite, 1 small sand (for aquarium), 1 fine white sand, 1 pouzzolane (volcanic lava), 1 aqualit (expansed ceramic for aquarium). The aqualit can be replaced by 1 of pouzzolane. Plants in this media grow slower but have a stronger root system. 

 

Pot : plastic, colour terracotta, diameter 20cm, height 12cm for forming a colony.

 

Cultivation : I think that a slightly airy situation inside the greenhouse is important to avoid air stagnation. For this reason, I use a fan 24h/24h all the year round.

Watering is very important : from May to September (summer). I let the media drying slightly between two watering. I use rain water poured on the top of the pot taking care not to wet the rosette.  From October to April, It is important to let the media drying completely (no watering) but with an atmospheric humidity of about 80%. 

The mentioned months are indicative and can change according to your own growing conditions. In fact, when this Pinguicula begins to produce its non-carnivorous leaves, you have to stop watering and let the pot drying out completely. Inversely, when the plant begins to produce in early spring its carnivorous leaves, you have to progressively start watering again the pot.

Temperatures : during growth period, day temperatures are about 25C but may reach 35C when the sun is shining on the greenhouse in spite of the use of shading covers. Night temperatures are around 20C. During resting period : day/night over freezing point. Lower temperature observed : - 4C. I use an electronic petroleum heater to provide heat.  

Flowering period : no data yet

Multiplication : The plants can be propagated  easily using non-carnivorous leaves separated from the rosette at the end of  winter. You only have to carefully tear out the totality of the leaf including the white base as the plantlets will sprout from this area. 

PICTURES: (click to enlarge)

 

Pinguicula nivalis in habitat in Mexico.

 

A new possible species visited by Fernando Rivadavia, Bob McMorris and Mike Manna during their Mexican trip in march 2004 (Read Postcard N12 by F.Rivadavia).

 

Mike and Bob in front of the habitat of a new species soon to be described by the famous Hans Luhrs under the name Pinguicula nivalis.

 

Photo : F.Rivadavia

 

Pinguicula nivalis growing in gypsum.

 

Photo : F.Rivadavia

 

The last flower of Pinguicula nivalis.

 

Photo : F.Rivadavia

 

Pinguicula nivalis grows in gypsum and show a similarity with P. immaculata.

 

Photo : F.Rivadavia

 

Fruiting scapes of Pinguicula nivalis emerging from the gypsum.

 

Photo : F.Rivadavia

 

Winter rosette Pinguicula nivalis growing in gypsum and show a similarity with P. immaculata.

 

Photo : F.Rivadavia

 

Fruiting scapes of Pinguicula nivalis emerging from the gypsum. Note the numerous dry rosette of Selaginella lepidophylla that may in the growing season covering the rosette of P. nivalis.

 

Photo : F.Rivadavia

 

Winter rosette of Pinguicula nivalis growing in gypsum and show a similarity with P. immaculata.

 

Photo : F.Rivadavia

 

Winter rosettes of Pinguicula nivalis.

 

Photo : F.Rivadavia

 

The flower of Pinguicula nivalis.

 

Photo : F.Rivadavia

 

Comparaison between Pinguicula immaculata (top) and Pinguicula nivalis (bottom).

 

Photo : F.Rivadavia

Pinguicula nivalis in culture

Pinguicula nivalis in culture.

Photo : Ruben Resendiz

Pinguicula nivalis in culture.

Photo : Ruben Resendiz

Close up of Pinguicula nivalis in culture.

Photo : Ruben Resendiz

Pinguicula nivalis flowering in culture.

 

Photo : Markus Welge

Website

Pinguicula nivalis flowering in culture.

 

Photo : Markus Welge

Website

Pinguicula nivalis flowering in culture.

 

Photo : Markus Welge

Website

Pinguicula nivalis flowering in culture.

 

Photo : Markus Welge

Website