Pinguicula ibarrae Zamudio

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TAXONOMY:

Family : Lentibulariaceae

Genus : Pinguicula

Name Pinguicula ibarrae 

 

Sub-classification (Casper) : link

Publication : Sergio Zamudio Ruiz.

" Dos especies nuevas de Pinguicula (Lentibulariaceae) de la Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico", Acta Botanica Mexicana (2005) N70, pages 69-83.

 

Synonyms : Can be found in few Pinguicula amateur's collection under its previous name among amateurs Pinguicula sp. Tlanchinol. 

DESCRIPTION : in Acta Botanica

Herba perennis; rhizoma simplex brevis, radicibus adventitiis numerosis filiformibus; folia radicalia rosulata, biformia; "hiemalia" 11 - 20, crassa, spathulata vel elliptica, 12 - 25  mm longa, 7 - 12.5 mm lata, apice obtusa vel rotundata, superne glandulis stipitatis dense vestita; "aestivalia" (8) 10 - 20, membranacea, solum adpressa, obovato-spathulata; 35 - 95 mm longa, 15 - 45 mm lata, apice rotundata, margine involuta, laete viridia, superne glandulosa, glandulis sessilibus et glandulis stipitatis dense vestita; hibernaculum nulla; pedunculi 5 - 12 erecti, pallide virides, glandulis stipitatis dense obsiti, 60 - 150 mm alti, uniflori; flores 24 - 35 mm longi (calcari incluso); calyx bilabiatus, laete viridis, extus et intus glandulis stipitatis dense obsitus; labium superum usque ad 1/2 - 2/3 longitudinis trilobum, lobis triangulatis vel ample ellipticis, 3.5 - 6 mm longis, 2 - 5 mm latis; labium inferum usque ad 1/2 - 2/3 longitudinis bilobum, lobis oblongo-ellipticis vel anguste ellipticis, acutis, 3 - 5 mm longis, 1.5 - 3 mm latis; corolla subisoloba, albida vel-albida cum margine lilacina et faucibus violaceo-maculatis, extus glandulis stipitatis disperse vestita; lobis subaequalibus, obovatis vel oblongis , basin versus subcunatis,longioribus quam latioribus, apice rotundatis vel truncatis, 7 - 14 mm longis, 5 - 12 mm latis, superne pilis longis cylindricis dense vestitis; tubus subcylindricus, luteo-viridis, basin versus leviter angustatus, 8 - 15 mm longus, 5 - 9 mm latus; extus glandulis stipitatis disperse obsitus, intus pilosus, pilis-longis cylindricis et pilis longis clavatissubcapitatis, sine palato; calcar subcylindricum, obtusum, anguste angulato-ovatum, 4.5 - 8 mm longum, 1.5 - 2.6 mm latum, cum tubo angulum obtuum (130 - 160) formans; ovarium subglobosum, glandulis stipitatis parvulis obsitum; stigma bilabiatum, album, labio infero superiorem superanti, suborbiculato, fimbriato; capsula subglobosa, 4 - 5 mm longa, 3 - 4 mm lata, glandulis stipitatis disperse obsita, semina numerosa, fusiformia, minutissima, +/- 1 mm longa, +/- 0.25 mm lata; pollinis granula (4) 5 - colporata.      

 

translation :

 

- soon -

 

 

ORIGIN AND HISTORY :

This species have been found and grown by a Mexican carnivorous plants grower, Sr. Adolfo Ibarra Vasquez. He is, above all, a restless Pinguicula hybridizer. Hes always attempting new crosses with whatever is in flower, marking the scapes with thin colorful wires (which can be spotted anywhere and everywhere in his greenhouse). He especially likes to use the various forms of P.agnata for his crosses, his favorite probably being a plant close to P. agnata he found near Tlanchinol. It was Pinguicula ibarrae

 

 

El Sr Adolfo Ibarra Vasquez in his impressive greenhouse. 

Photo : F. Rivadavia

more on Sr. Adolfo Ibarra Vasquez's greenhouse

Map / LOCALISATION : 

This species from Mexico, state of Hidalgo, is known from three populations up to now :

- Municipality of Tlanchinol (+/- 11 km at North of Tlanchinol)

- at North-east of Tlanchinol (+/- 13km)

- between, Pachuca and Tampico (18-23 miles South of Huejutla).  

 

HABITAT:         

P. ibarrae grow on very inclinated slopes composed of "rocas lutitas" that are, indeed, sedimentary rocks composed largely of clay particles of varying sizes with a north orientation. Altitude are from 900 to 1 100 m. This species is found between the "Bosque mesofilo de montana" (Areas protected from wind and sun, which  favours a high air humidity with Liquidambar styraciflua, Clethra sp. and Quercus spp. ) and the" Bosque tropical perennifolio" (The floristic composition of the tropical forest perennifolio is very varied and rich in species, particularly of trees and also a good representation of epiphytic species).

Introduction in culture :

Few leaves and seeds of this species were collected in Mexico and sent to Europe and USA. 

 

This species can be now purchased in few nurseries in Europe like www.bestcarnivorousplants.com or by sharing cuttings of this species with others amateurs.

CULTURE AND MULTIPLICATION : 

(North hemisphere, France near Paris, in a polycarbonate greenhouse - see the map -)

Life cycle : The life cycle observed in culture for this Pinguicula consists of two seasons, one wet and the other dry (see link). P. ibarrae is mainly flowering in habitat from september to march during the winter months. If grown in cool and shaded conditions in culture, this species can keep its carnivorous plants all year round. A compact winter leaves rosette can be formed only in dry conditions.

 

Media : I use a 100 % mineral media : 2 perlite, 2 vermiculite, 1 small sand (for aquarium), 1 fine white sand, 1 pouzzolane (volcanic lava), 1 aqualit (expansed ceramic for aquarium). The aqualit can be replaced by 1 of pouzzolane. Plants in this media grow slower but have a stronger root system.

 

Pot : plastic, colour terracotta, diameter 12.5cm, height 12cm.

 

Cultivation : I think that a slightly airy situation inside the greenhouse is important to avoid air stagnation. For this reason, I use a fan 24h/24h all the year round.

Watering is very important : from May to September (summer). I let the media drying slightly between two watering. I use rain water poured on the top of the pot taking care not to wet the rosette.  From October to April, It is important to let the media drying completely (no watering) but with an atmospheric humidity of about 80%. It seems that this species can be watering and keep growing all year round but I can't confirm it yet.

The mentioned months are indicative and can change according to your own growing conditions. In fact, when this Pinguicula begins to produce its non-carnivorous leaves, you have to stop watering and let the pot drying out completely. Inversely, when the plant begins to produce in early spring its carnivorous leaves, you have to progressively start watering again the pot.

Temperatures : during growth period, day temperatures are about 25C but can reach 35C when the sun is shining on the greenhouse in spite of the use of shading covers. Night temperatures are around 20C. During resting period : day/night I prefer keeping the plant over 10C.

 

Multiplication : As I only hosted since few months this species and via a cutting, I didn't have a flower yet so I am not able to tell if this species can be selfed or not.  

P. ibarrae can be propagated easily using non-carnivorous leaves separated from the rosette at the end of winter. You only have to carefully tear out all the leaf particularly with the white base. The new plantlets will sprout from this area.

PICTURES: (click to enlarge)

 

 

The habitat of P.ibarrae.

Photo : F. Rivadavia

 

The habitat of P.ibarrae.

Photo : F. Rivadavia

A cluster of P.ibarrae.

Photo : F. Rivadavia

The flowers of P.ibarrae have a close similarity with those of Pinguicula agnata.

Photo : F. Rivadavia

Pinguicula ibarrae flowering in habitat.

Photo : F. Rivadavia

The rosettes are very variable in color.

Photo : F. Rivadavia

The flowers of P.ibarrae have a close similarity with those of Pinguicula agnata.

Photo : F. Rivadavia

A so close flower to those of Pinguicula agnata. 

Photo : F. Rivadavia

Note the hairy lobes of P.ibarrae like those of P. pilosa or P. agnata.

Photo : F. Rivadavia

 You can also read the postcard N6 of Fernando Rivadavia where he spotted this species in habitat near Tlanchinol , Hidalgo in 2003.

 

The habitat of Pinguicula ibarrae revisited in 2009 by Radek Kastner.

(See articles's area with a 5600 km tour in Mexico)

Two sites of Pinguicula ibarrae on the road from Molango to Tlanchinol, Hidalgo state, Mexico, 1112 m above sea level. There were thousands of plants.
 

Pinguicula ibarrae grows on steep of vertical rocky slopes.
 

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

The impressive habitat of Pinguicula ibarrae.
 

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

The slope consists of some kind of very eroded sedimentary or maybe ingneous rock. Surface rock is very unstable and seems like to be some kind of fine aggregate. But from longer distance you can distinguish individual layers.

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

Rocky slopes are ca up to 20-25 m tall. Plants were growing on the bare rock, in crevices, on the moss or fern layers. On places where there was more dense vegetation, only few or no plants at all could be seen. It seems, that where plants were growing, moisture was a little bit higher.

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

Rosettes of Pinguicula ibarrae with yellowish-green coloured leaves for the youngest to pinkish red for the oldest.

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

P. ibarrae growing on bare rock in crevices.

Plants had (mostly) really huge rosettes.

Common size was ca from 10 to 15 cm.
 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

 


An almost green rossette with fine red undertone.
 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

Here again, some rosettes of Pinguicula ibarrae with yellowish-green coloured leaves for the youngest to pinkish red for the oldest.

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

 

Pinguicula ibarrae.

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

Pinguicula ibarrae with a green rosette with red margins.

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

 

Colonies of P. ibarrae with many plants growing together were commonly found on the sites.

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

 

Pinguicula ibarrae with all green rosettes.

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

 

Dense populations of Pinguicula ibarrae in habitat.

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

Impressive clusters of Pinguicula ibarrae growing closely from each others.

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

 

Pinguicula ibarrae flowering in habitat.

 

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

Pinguicula ibarrae flowering in habitat.

Photo : Radek KASTNER

July-August 2009

 

 

 

COMPARAISON OF P. IBARRAE WITH FEW OTHER CLOSED SPECIES : 

 

 

 

P. IBARRAE P. PILOSA P. AGNATA 

The short spur of Pinguicula ibarrae.

Photo : F. Rivadavia

The short spur of Pinguicula pilosa.

 

Photo: O.Gluch

www.gluch.info

 

The short spur of Pinguicula agnata.

 

Photo: Serge Mallet

- September 2002 -

A so close flower to those of Pinguicula agnata. 

Photo : F. Rivadavia

A deep coloured flower of Pinguicula pilosa.

 

Photo: O.Gluch

www.gluch.info

A deep coloured flower of Pinguicula agnata.

 

Photo: Serge Mallet

- September 2002 -

A flower of Pinguicula ibarrae

Photo : F. Rivadavia

A rare white flower of Pinguicula pilosa

Photo: Patrice Charpentier

The white flower of Pinguicula agnata ' El Lobo '  

 

Photo: Oliver Gluch

Close up of the rosette of the summer rosette of Pinguicula ibarrae.

Photo : F. Rivadavia

The summer rosette of Pinguicula pilosa.

 

Photo: O.Gluch

www.gluch.info

The summer rosette of Pinguicula agnata.

 

Photo: Fernando Rivadavia

The winter rosette of P. ibarrae

- soon -

The hairy winter rosette of Pinguicula pilosa.

 

Photo: O.Gluch

www.gluch.info

Pinguicula agnata 'type'. Winter rosette.

 

Photo: Eric Partrat

- November 1998 -