BIZARRE GALLERY (page 1) 

 

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Sometimes our plants want to amaze us and adopt a so uncommon look...

 

If you have this kind of pictures and would like to share it with all of us, send an email to epbb@club-internet.fr

 

Pinguicula fiorii : flower with 6 lobes

Photo : Eric Partrat

Pinguicula fiorii : flower with spidery form

Photo : Eric Partrat

Pinguicula 'Weser' with two spurs and 6 corolla lobes

Photo : Eric Partrat

Pinguicula 'Weser' with two spurs and 6 corolla lobes

Photo : Eric Partrat

Pinguicula moranensis with a strange pitcher shape leaf on an aborted flower stalk.

Photos : Eric Partrat

 

Pinguicula moranensis with a strange pitcher shape leaf on an aborted flower stalk.

Photos : Eric Partrat

Pinguicula moranensis with a strange pitcher shape leaf on an aborted flower stalk.

Photos : Eric Partrat

Pinguicula moranensis

So, flower or leaf ?

 

 

 

Photos : Eric Partrat

Strange crestate Pinguicula moranensis.

(There were no greenflies ! )

Photo : Eric Partrat

Here is the reason of not using Brandy in your growing media

Photo : Eric Partrat

Pinguicula poldinii with 4 corolla lobes

Photo : Eric Partrat

This is a rare form of Pinguicula alpina 'green leaves' with at a distancy only of 5 cm, a Pinguicula alpina totally red. The two plants were in full sun !.

Photo : Eric Partrat

This is a wall of an old middle-age castle. The yellow blotches are Pinguicula vulgaris. Is it a middle age form ?

Photo : Eric Partrat

The plants are growing between the rocks. There are no Pinguicula vulgaris locations around (nearest at 25km). How does this population succeeded in climbing here ? If you don't believe me,have a look on the following picture of the castle !

Photo : Eric Partrat

Impressive location, isn't it ?

If you have an hypothesis to explain the arrival of Pinguicula vulgaris on this middle age castle, send a mail to epbb@club-internet.fr

 

An hypothesis from Daniele Sottili (Italy)

" I've an hypotesis about your photo of P.vulgaris in a castle's wall: I read somewhere that P.vulgaris was used in the past centuries to curdle the milk to create cheese (I don't know what regions had this acient tradition), so maybe some people of the castle had collected plants with mature seed pods."

Pinguicula moranensis with a strange pitcher shape leaf.

Photo : Kit Halsted

- November 2002 -

Pinguicula moranensis with a strange pitcher shape leaf.

Photo : Kit Halsted

- November 2002 -

Pinguicula moranensis with a strange pitcher shape leaf.

Photo : Kit Halsted

- November 2002 -

 

Pinguicula pitcher

 

This tissue-cultured P. moranensis was purchased from Agristarts by Steve LaWarre in late 2001 or early 2002. He noted that flowers from this batch of plants were sticky and had double spurs. I acquired it, and another from the same batch, in a trade in August 2002. I planted
it in a tall, undrained, pot in an open soil mix and placed it in an East-facing window. Changing circumstances forced me to move it to a much less sunny West-facing window in late September 2002. I noticed this strange leaf after accidentally allowing the pot to dry out almost completely. The growth crowns of both of these plants are dividing. It's worth noting that the other plant, which has been in the West-facing window and watered on the tray method, appears to be almost perfectly normal.

 

Kit Halsted

email : kit@carnivorousplants.nyc.ny.us

web site : http://www.carnivorousplants.nyc.ny.us/

 

Pinguicula moranensis with a strange pitcher shape leaf.

Photo : Kit Halsted

- November 2002 -

Pinguicula moranensis with a strange pitcher shape leaf.

Photo : Kit Halsted

- November 2002 -

A strange Pinguicula jaumavensis with bicolored leaves.

Photo : Eric Partrat

- September 2002 -

Pinguicula crystallina subsp. hirtiflora with three upper lobes. 

Photo : Jurg Steiger